Promoting the Traditional Latin Mass in Central Iowa

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TLM in Des Moines Changes Time

Friends,

Starting Sunday, August 7th, the weekly TLM at St. Augustin moves to 4pm.

Here is Fr. Pisut’s note announcing the change:

Dear TLM Community,

Believe it or not it has been a month since the TLM has moved to St.
Augustin. By all accounts things seem to be going well. I have a pastor’s
column that goes out in a weekly email that you should get if you are
registered at the parish (one more reason to register). However, I thought it
would be helpful if I reached out to just the TLM community to update you
on a few things. I might do this from time to time to keep communication
open and to help build the TLM Community.

In order to help with the transition of the TLM from St. Anthony’s to St.
Augustin and aid in my pastoring of the community I assembled a TLM
Council. It’s basically like a parish/pastoral council. I chose membership
based upon people who held leadership roles in the TLM itself (MC’s and
Choir Director), St. Anthony’s Pastoral Council members and Una Voce
officers. Members of the TLM Council are Andy Milam, Jacob Heflin, Taylor
Fernholz, Tom Ogden, Jason Pendergraft, Wendy Ogden, Bryan Gonzalez,
Rachel Marr, Audra Hutton, Rosie Heflin and Samantha Fernholz. While
you are always free to reach out to me, you can also bring questions and concerns to these members as well.

We would like to facilitate a smoother reception of Holy Communion at Mass. We ask that when receiving you begin the line at the far right (Epistle) side all the way to the far left (Gospel) side of the altar/communion rail.
When the railing is full, we ask that you stand in front of the pews in the same direction from left to right (Epistle to Gospel side) and fill in as people depart the altar/communion rail. To this end we will have ushers help to
direct people, but we hope that this will be a short-term necessity and that they will eventually not be required.

In addition, our altar/communion rail cloth has arrived. It will hang over the front of the railing. As you kneel simply fold your hands underneath the cloth. The altar/communion rail cloth is one of the many great traditions
of our Catholic Faith. It is a sign of the sacredness of Holy Communion. Historically, it was a means of catching the host should it fall, like the patens that we also use out of reverence for the Sacred Species. In addition, by
keeping our hands under the cloth it is a reminder that we are to receive our Lord reverently on the tongue.

Many of the TLM families also home school. One of the preferred educational methods is the Catechesis of the Good Shepherd (CGS), though it is not limited to home schooling. We are blessed at St. Augustin to have a well-established program under the leadership of Janis Falk, our Director of Religious Education. Some of you may already be familiar with her. If you are interested in enrolling your children in the CGS program please contact
Janis or Cindy Sullivan, our Office Manager.

Lastly, I am pleased to announce that beginning August 7, 2022, the TLM will move to 4:00 P.M. This decision was made after consultation with and the unanimous agreement of the TLM Council and the approval of +Bishop Joensen. This change represents a listening to the TLM community and an attempt to provide for your needs. I do recognize that many would prefer a morning Mass time. While I understand your desire, it simply is not possible with the Mass schedule at St. Augustin. Still, the new Mass time will help to facilitate earlier dinner times, mitigate nighttime winter driving and make your evening schedules easier overall. Do not fear, confession will still be available before Mass from 3:15-3:45 in the east/St. Joseph side confessional.

I hope that after a month that you are starting to feel at home at St. Augustin. Though I was not expecting this role it is my pleasure to be your pastor. I look forward to strengthening the TLM community as we give glory to God through the Holy Sacrifice of this ancient and perennial form of the Mass. As you should have grasped from the reception following the first Mass, you are welcome here. I will say it one last time, welcome home.

Fr. Pisut

The Presence of God and the Latin Mass

One of the local deacons, Deacon Mike Manno, who frequently attends/serves our TLM community wrote this last month, and we thought it was interesting and wanted to share with our followers.

Those of you who have followed this column know that about seven months ago I had a stroke. Fortunately, through the mercy of God, I quickly recovered with little or no problems. However, it has affected my sight; I can no longer read well, struggling to make out each word like a first grader following his fingers across the page, and my peripheral vision has been compromised to the point that I still cannot drive.

Thus when I am at the altar assisting at Mass, I can no longer proclaim the Gospel, nor can I read the Prayers of the Faithful. The priest will read the Gospel for me and the lector will read the prayers. I still cannot preach since I write out all my homilies and, not being a gifted speaker, would simply read them.

So one of my drawbacks from the stroke was that I was no longer able to assist at a cross-town Latin Mass that I would attend every Sunday evening. I had been doing so for several years at the invitation of that parish’s pastor, an old friend, and his associate with whom I had gotten to know very well.
Not being a Latin scholar, I could do little more than sit in choir, read the Epistle and Gospel in English, preach occasionally, and help with the distribution of Communion — the Latin Mass protocols only allow for an ordained minister, deacon or priest, to do so. Unfortunately, the partial loss of my vision was enough to keep me from driving to the Latin Mass and I was unable to participate.

With the pastor and assistant there were only about three other priests in our geographic area who could say the Latin Mass, so when the pastor retired due to health issues, and the associate was sent for additional schooling out of state, it sounded trouble for the Latin Mass.

However, our bishop, William Joensen, asked my pastor if he and our parish could continue the Latin Mass, and he agreed. Last night was our first Latin Mass and I was there, in choir, for the first time since October 24, and I couldn’t have been happier! It brought a newness and a fresh perspective and appreciation for the Latin Mass that was renewed yesterday.
My first observation is one I have really taken to heart, because it is now something I use. When we distribute Communion at the Novus Ordo Mass we say to them, “The Body of Christ,” as most receive standing and in the hand. That always seemed to me to show a lack of reverence, almost as if I was handing out cookies to children as an after lunch treat.

I was always more impressed by the Latin formula. As communicants are kneeling at an altar rail, they receive on the tongue as they say, “Corpus Domini nostri Iesu Christi custodiat animam tuam in vitam aeternam. Amen.” Translated, “May the body of our Lord Jesus Christ preserve your soul unto life everlasting. Amen.”

In my mind, that is more reverent and expresses an important theological truth. Thus I use the English translation when taking Communion to the homebound and hospitalized, then I say “the Body of Christ.”

But there is something that I apparently am not the only one to notice. It is the growing number of young people who attend.

I noticed that when I first started assisting at the Latin Mass. I saw the volume of young families with small children who were present, and many of them were the parents of the many youngsters who were taking part as servers and acolytes, and they showed up last night.

Just to give you an example, we had two deacons — one on the cusp of priestly Ordination, and a seminarian sitting in choir, two MCs, two altar servers and six acolytes, most under nine. And the reaction of our regular parishioners was amazement.

Several mentioned to me how they were surprised to see so many young girls dressed as if it were First Communion, and the number of men who wore ties, not to mention the veils on so many of the women and girls. They commented on the beauty of the Traditional Latin chants and hymns as well as the use of incense during certain parts of the Mass.

It all underscored what I saw from a friend of mine, an ex-con who started RCIA with me a few years ago. I had taken him to my parish church and later to the Latin Mass. Now here was a man of no faith background who was actively looking forward to his Baptism and reception into the Church.
When I asked him why he was making such a transition, he said it was very simple: In the church, especially at the Latin Mass, he could feel the presence of God and that is where he wanted to be. Unfortunately for my friend, one stupid mistake caused him to be arrested and sent back to prison on a probation violation. What is worse is the correctional system was largely closed by COVID and he was confined for several years.

I continued to keep in touch with him, answering his questions about Catholicism, and sending him copies of lessons from our RCIA syllabus. I found out later he began to share those lessons with fellow inmates. After several indicated that they were Catholic, they formed a group of Catholic inmates who would meet regularly to discuss religion.

I was a bit surprised to note that his prison counselor, when writing about him to the state parole board, noted that he was the leader of the Catholic inmates group. His parole was granted and by the time this is published he should be released and his first priority is to attend the Latin Mass at his “home” parish and to finally become a baptized Catholic, a ceremony I intend to perform myself.

So why was an agnostic so attracted to the Latin Mass that his deepest desire is to become Catholic? I think it is for the same reason men showed up with ties, little girls in dresses, and the little boys are clamoring to serve as acolytes, and young families making the Latin parish its parish of choice.
It is that for 2,000 years the Church has brought people to God by using all their senses. Everything that is done is clearly done for the glory of the Almighty, from the architecture to the music, stained glass, Gregorian chant, and incense. It is not that a lot of folks understand Latin, it is that the whole package combines to bring, as my friend noted, the presence of God to any with an open heart.

I know there are those who pooh-pooh the “old” Mass, and many consider it divisive. It is not. It is a unifying point that has been bringing the presence of God to the people for two centuries. I’m very proud of the part my parish is now playing in carrying out that mission, and proud of my very small part in it.

(Source: https://thewandererpress.com/catholic/news/frontpage/the-presence-of-god-and-the-latin-mass/)

Join us on Sunday, June 12th!

For the first time in decades, the Traditional Latin Mass will return to St. Augustin Church in Des Moines on Sunday, June 12th at 5pm.

As you recall, the Diocese has announced that the weekly celebration of the TLM will be moved to St. Augustin from now on.

Following this inaugural TLM on Sunday, June 12th, there will be a welcome reception by the parish for the TLM community.

At Una Voce DSM, we’re grateful to Fr. Pisut, the Knights of Columbus, and Altar & Rosary Society for “rolling out the red carpet” and welcoming us.

If you’ve not been to a TLM before, join us on Trinity Sunday!

Mass of the Ages Documentary

Discover the Latin Mass in a way you never have!

WHAT IS ‘MASS OF THE AGES’ ABOUT?

MASS OF THE AGES is a documentary trilogy that explores the richness of the Traditional Latin Mass through stunning cinematography and inspiring stories. But it’s not just three beautiful films. It’s also an investigation into the surprising events that led to the creation of the New Mass. MASS OF THE AGES will give you a deep appreciation for your Catholic faith.

Episode 1 debuted in August 2015 and Episode 2 debuted in May 2022.

Enjoy these two episodes, and encourage your family and friends to join us one a Sunday (or two) at St. Augustin’s Des Moines @ 5pm.

For more questions: info@unavocedsm.org.

Diocesan Announcement about TLM Location Change

Dear Traditionally-minded friends,

Good evening! A special thanks to Fr. Chicoine for celebrating the TLM this evening, and to Fr. Pisut for announcing this news (see official announcement below) that will affect our TLM community. 

On behalf of Una Voce Des Moines, I want to express my heartfelt gratitude to St. Anthony’s and Msgr. Chiodo, and all of the associate pastors who have celebrated the TLM over the years – most recently, Fr. Dolan – for their steadfast commitment to the traditional mass, the traditional sacraments, and our community. We will greatly miss the St Anthony community. 

Ever since last summer, when the motu proprio was issued, His Excellency has made it clear that the TLM community was an important part of the Diocese of Des Moines. 

This move to St. Augustin demonstrates the diocese’s ongoing commitment to providing stable pastoral care to the TLM community, for which we are all grateful. 

I am grateful to Fr. Pisut for his willingness to accept our young and growing community into his well-established parish.

The leaders of Una Voce Des Moines and the TLM community look forward to working  together with Fr. Pisut and St. Augustin to make this transition as smooth as possible. 

Wishing you and yours a blessed Mothers Day!

Oremus pro invicem,

Bryan Gonzalez
Una Voce Des Moines
President 


Quo Primum

Promulgating the Tridentine Liturgy

Pope Pius V – 1570

APOSTOLIC CONSTITUTION

From the very first, upon Our elevation to the chief Apostleship, We gladly turned our mind and energies and directed all our thoughts to those matters which concerned the preservation of a pure liturgy, and We strove with God’s help, by every means in our power, to accomplish this purpose. For, besides other decrees of the sacred Council of Trent, there were stipulations for Us to revise and re-edit the sacred books: the Catechism, the Missal and the Breviary. With the Catechism published for the instruction of the faithful, by God’s help, and the Breviary thoroughly revised for the worthy praise of God, in order that the Missal and Breviary may be in perfect harmony, as fitting and proper – for its most becoming that there be in the Church only one appropriate manner of reciting the Psalms and only one rite for the celebration of Mass – We deemed it necessary to give our immediate attention to what still remained to be done, viz, the re-editing of the Missal as soon as possible.

Hence, We decided to entrust this work to learned men of our selection. They very carefully collated all their work with the ancient codices in Our Vatican Library and with reliable, preserved or emended codices from elsewhere. Besides this, these men consulted the works of ancient and approved authors concerning the same sacred rites; and thus they have restored the Missal itself to the original form and rite of the holy Fathers. When this work has been gone over numerous times and further emended, after serious study and reflection, We commanded that the finished product be printed and published as soon as possible, so that all might enjoy the fruits of this labor; and thus, priests would know which prayers to use and which rites and ceremonies they were required to observe from now on in the celebration of Masses.

Let all everywhere adopt and observe what has been handed down by the Holy Roman Church, the Mother and Teacher of the other churches, and let Masses not be sung or read according to any other formula than that of this Missal published by Us. This ordinance applies henceforth, now, and forever, throughout all the provinces of the Christian world, to all patriarchs, cathedral churches, collegiate and parish churches, be they secular or religious, both of men and of women – even of military orders – and of churches or chapels without a specific congregation in which conventual Masses are sung aloud in choir or read privately in accord with the rites and customs of the Roman Church. This Missal is to be used by all churches, even by those which in their authorization are made exempt, whether by Apostolic indult, custom, or privilege, or even if by oath or official confirmation of the Holy See, or have their rights and faculties guaranteed to them by any other manner whatsoever.

This new rite alone is to be used unless approval of the practice of saying Mass differently was given at the very time of the institution and confirmation of the church by Apostolic See at least 200 years ago, or unless there has prevailed a custom of a similar kind which has been continuously followed for a period of not less than 200 years, in which most cases We in no wise rescind their above-mentioned prerogative or custom. However, if this Missal, which we have seen fit to publish, be more agreeable to these latter, We grant them permission to celebrate Mass according to its rite, provided they have the consent of their bishop or prelate or of their whole Chapter, everything else to the contrary notwithstanding.

All other of the churches referred to above, however, are hereby denied the use of other missals, which are to be discontinued entirely and absolutely; whereas, by this present Constitution, which will be valid henceforth, now, and forever, We order and enjoin that nothing must be added to Our recently published Missal, nothing omitted from it, nor anything whatsoever be changed within it under the penalty of Our displeasure.

We specifically command each and every patriarch, administrator, and all other persons or whatever ecclesiastical dignity they may be, be they even cardinals of the Holy Roman Church, or possessed of any other rank or pre-eminence, and We order them in virtue of holy obedience to chant or to read the Mass according to the rite and manner and norm herewith laid down by Us and, hereafter, to discontinue and completely discard all other rubrics and rites of other missals, however ancient, which they have customarily followed; and they must not in celebrating Mass presume to introduce any ceremonies or recite any prayers other than those contained in this Missal.

Furthermore, by these presents [this law], in virtue of Our Apostolic authority, We grant and concede in perpetuity that, for the chanting or reading of the Mass in any church whatsoever, this Missal is hereafter to be followed absolutely, without any scruple of conscience or fear of incurring any penalty, judgment, or censure, and may freely and lawfully be used. Nor are superiors, administrators, canons, chaplains, and other secular priests, or religious, of whatever title designated, obliged to celebrate the Mass otherwise than as enjoined by Us. We likewise declare and ordain that no one whosoever is forced or coerced to alter this Missal, and that this present document cannot be revoked or modified, but remain always valid and retain its full force notwithstanding the previous constitutions and decrees of the Holy See, as well as any general or special constitutions or edicts of provincial or synodal councils, and notwithstanding the practice and custom of the aforesaid churches, established by long and immemorial prescription – except, however, if more than two hundred years’ standing.

It is Our will, therefore, and by the same authority, We decree that, after We publish this constitution and the edition of the Missal, the priests of the Roman Curia are, after thirty days, obliged to chant or read the Mass according to it; all others south of the Alps, after three months; and those beyond the Alps either within six months or whenever the Missal is available for sale. Wherefore, in order that the Missal be preserved incorrupt throughout the whole world and kept free of flaws and errors, the penalty for nonobservance for printers, whether mediately or immediately subject to Our dominion, and that of the Holy Roman Church, will be the forfeiting of their books and a fine of one hundred gold ducats, payable ipso facto to the Apostolic Treasury. Further, as for those located in other parts of the world, the penalty is excommunication latae sententiae, and such other penalties as may in Our judgment be imposed; and We decree by this law that they must not dare or presume either to print or to publish or to sell, or in any way to accept books of this nature without Our approval and consent, or without the express consent of the Apostolic Commissaries of those places, who will be appointed by Us. Said printer must receive a standard Missal and agree faithfully with it and in no wise vary from the Roman Missal of the large type (secundum magnum impressionem).

Accordingly, since it would be difficult for this present pronouncement to be sent to all parts of the Christian world and simultaneously come to light everywhere, We direct that it be, as usual, posted and published at the doors of the Basilica of the Prince of the Apostles, also at the Apostolic Chancery, and on the street at Campo Flora; furthermore, We direct that printed copies of this same edict signed by a notary public and made official by an ecclesiastical dignitary possess the same indubitable validity everywhere and in every nation, as if Our manuscript were shown there. Therefore, no one whosoever is permitted to alter this notice of Our permission, statute, ordinance, command, precept, grant, indult, declaration, will, decree, and prohibition. Would anyone, however, presume to commit such an act, he should know that he will incur the wrath of Almighty God and of the Blessed Apostles Peter and Paul.

Given at St. Peter’s in the year of the Lord’s Incarnation, 1570, on the 14th of July of the Fifth year of Our Pontificate.

Taken from: https://www.papalencyclicals.net/pius05/p5quopri.htm

Full Latin text: http://www.intratext.com/IXT/LAT0816/_P1.HTM

St. Padre Pio Statue is Installed and Dedicated

Back in the spring 2021, the officers of Una Voce Des Moines invited you to participate in a project to commission a statue of St. Padre Pio.  Despite delays due to covid and shipping complications, the statue arrived this month, and we have mounted it on the last colonnade near the SE doors.  

First, we want to thank you for your support in offering this as a gift to St. Anthony’s for their weekly celebration of the Traditional Latin Mass.  Following the announcement from His Excellency earlier this month, this gift seems all the more appropriate.

And, to Msgr. Chiodo, Father Dolan, and all the priests who celebrate this Mass and serve this community:  thank you for welcoming the Traditional Latin Mass into the parish on a regular basis.  We appreciate having a home and feeling so welcome.  We are honored and delighted to make this oblation to you.

Padre Pio is a beloved Italian saint, and its veneration will be well-received at St. Anthony’s.

You’ll notice below the statue, there’s a plaque, which reads:

Per il mondo sarebbe più facile esistere senza il sole
che senza la Santa Messa.

(It would be easier for the world to exist without the sun
than without the Holy Mass.)

– Padre Pio

In thanksgiving for the frequent offering
of the Traditional Latin Mass,
this statue of St. Padre Pio is a gift
from the Members of Una Voce Des Moines

This saying from Padre Pio highlights one of the reasons we all attend this solemn liturgical rite.

Here are some photos:

We have a 2022 Liturgical Calendar!

Friends, we have a personalized 2022 liturgical calendar!

Thanks to TAN Press and the graphic design of Jose Vitteri, we have a 2022 Liturgical Calendar just in time for Advent/Christmas shopping!

The unique 11″ x 11″, card stock cover calendar contains high quality images of Traditionis Pulchritudo, The Beauty of Tradition, which happens to be the theme of this year’s calendar.

Here are some images:

Each day has indications for the liturgical calendar in both Usus Antiquior (old calendar feast days) and the Usus Recentior (new calendar feast days), as well as abstinence or fast symbols.  Note that under each day of the week there is a theme which is traditionally observed.

There’s an entire page on spiritual fasting and the symbols that each day indicate.

Proceeds benefit Una Voce Des Moines and the continued promotion of the Traditional Mass throughout Central Iowa, whose home is at St. Anthony’s

Be sure to share with your friends and family, but order quickly as Christmas is in a few weeks and we have a limited supply!

Calendar costs:

1 calendar – $20

6 calendar – $100

(Additional cost for shipping TBD)

For more information, email Bryan @ info@unavocedsm.org or call/text 812.686.6102.

The Diocese of Des Moines Responds to Traditionis Custodes

Back in mid-July, Pope Francis issued a motu proprio which made certain restrictions regarding the Usus Antiquior, the use of the 1962 Missal.

On Sunday, October 10th, His Excellency, William Joensen, Bishop of Des Moines, issued the following document which was read at the weekly TLM at St. Anthony’s.

On behalf of Una Voce Des Moines, we’re grateful to both His Excellency for his continued pastoral care to and support of those who are spiritually fed and nourished by the the ancient form of the Mass, as well as to the dedicated priests who faithfully celebrate it, especially Msgr. Chiodo and Fr. Dolan.

Ad multos annos!

The PDF can be viewed here.

Response to today’s Motu Proprio, Traditionis Custodes

This morning, His Holiness, Pope Francis issued a motu proprio called Traditionis Custodes, along with a clarifying letter to the Bishops of the World, which addresses the celebration of the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.

Una Voce Des Moines has been in touch with the Diocese and with St. Anthony’s, who published a statement on their Facebook page.

If you do have questions or concerns, please direct them to Una Voce Des Moines Officer, Andy Milam (camilam42@gmail.com).

When we know more information, we’ll share as soon as possible. 

As more comes to light, let us offer prayers and fasting for all involved, including the Bishops, Priests, and Faithful of the world who have a devotion to the Traditional Latin Mass.

Beatae Mariae Virgine de Monte Carmelo, ora pro nobis.

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