Una Voce Des Moines

Promoting the Traditional Latin Mass in Central Iowa

A Protestant Goes to Mass…

As someone who only fairly recently in his life started attending Latin Mass, I can related to awe this man felt at his first couple Latin Masses.

Meditation for a Time of Pestilence

One of our favorite places is Our Lady of Clear Creek Abbey in Oklahoma. Abbot Philip sent this reflection, which is so apropos during this time of crisis, and we wanted to share it with you. The article can be found on their website here: https://clearcreekmonks.org/meditation-for-a-time-of-pestilence/

It would be the understatement of the millennium to suggest that, perhaps, something is awry in the world at present and that a global health crisis has sadly impacted the way we live as Catholic Christians. Not only are we witnesses to the spectacle of so many people growing ill and even dying, but the very Bread of Life entrusted to us from Heaven has been locked up in such a manner that the great number of the faithful is unable to receive this vital spiritual nourishment. I blame no one in particular.

Pandemic need not become Pandæmonium. After all, the Holy Trinity is still supreme in Heaven; the choirs of Angels still hold together in perfect order; the stars continue to follow their perpetual track; the birds are already busy building nests; and, as has been famously said, the “snail’s on the thorn”. We still have (quite intact) the faith along with all the virtues and gifts of the Holy Spirit. The grace of God is operating now as ever. While some may not be able to assist in person at the Holy Sacrifice of Mass and receive Our Lord in Communion, we are free to visit in spirit all the tabernacles of the world, where the real presence reigns in humble and silent majesty. All may still receive Holy Communion in a spiritual manner. What did the Lord tell us? “But thou when thou shalt pray, enter into thy chamber, and having shut the door, pray to thy Father in secret: and thy Father who seeth in secret will repay thee” (Mt. 6:6). Who cannot do this even now? We must all become contemplatives for a time.

While I well appreciate that the phenomenon of live streaming enables many faithful to participate in some manner in the celebration of Mass, I worry that some will be under the impression that their television or computer screen has become their only hope, the only contact with God that is left to them. What folly! In various times and places throughout the centuries Christians have found themselves unable for a time to receive the sacraments. Some of the first holy hermits lived so far away in the desert as never to be able to receive the Holy Eucharist. As Our Blessed Father Saint Benedict teaches us, “Let [the monk] consider that he is always beheld from heaven by God, and that his actions are everywhere seen by the eye of the Divine Majesty, and are every hour reported to Him by His angels” (Rule, Chapter 7). Each one can be creative in living the faith in this dramatic circumstance.

Who is responsible for the novel corona virus outbreak? You and I. In a time when thousands upon thousands of the unborn are legally deprived of life across the globe and when the sacred institution of marriage has been flouted and ridiculed in so many places, there should be no surprise that God would allow a microbe to bring mankind to its knees. So, what must be done? The entire world is wondering.

The Governor of Texas, it seems, has signed an executive order prohibiting counties and cities in his State from banning religious services during the coronavirus crisis. Such services will be considered essential in Texas. Now there is an Abbott after my heart: he may not be a Benedictine, but he is one courageous Abbott! Would that his wise and very practical advice be widely appreciated and taken into consideration.

We monks, the sons of Our Lady, will celebrate this year, possibly as never before, the great liturgical ceremonies of the Sacred Triduum. We will do this with you and for you (although attendance at public masses remains suspended), wherever you may be. “But the hour cometh,” said Christ to the Samaritan woman, “and now is, when the true adorers shall adore the Father in spirit and in truth. For the Father also seeketh such to adore him” (Jn. 4:23). Above all, with you and for you, we will live in the joy of belonging to God of Whom no virus can deprive us. Soon the Son of God will triumph over the darkness of death. Soon the global health crisis will subside and disappear, even if more patience be needed. May our hearts be found faithful and full of that hope and love that give the supernatural measure of the great endeavor we are engaged in as Christians. “And now there remain faith, hope, and charity, these three: but the greatest of these is charity” (I Cor. 13:13).

Abbot Philip Anderson, O.S.B.

A Mass Reflection

To many of the faithful, Holy Week without mass is such a foreign concept, Easter Sunday has been taken for granted. Even many who do not regularly attend mass (or even the nonbelieving) still always find themselves sitting down in a pew on Easter Sunday. This year millions of Catholics around the world will instead find themselves at home (hopefully) watching a livestream of mass instead.

What makes mass so special? Other than receiving the Body of Christ, mass in itself is a reminder of the suffering Jesus himself went through for our sake. This week, let’s all reflect on what we cannot attend in person.

Habemus Kalendarium! (We have a Calendar) SOLD OUT

UPDATE 2/4/2020 We are sold out for the year. We would like to thank everyone for their patronage and hope they return next winter for the 2021 calendar.

Friends, we have a personalized 2020 liturgical calendar!

Thanks to the excellent photos of Lisa Bourne, as well as Jose Vitteri’s graphic design skills, we have a 2020 Liturgical Calendar just in time for Christmas shopping!

The unique 12″ x 12″, card stock calendar contains high quality images of Traditional Masses celebrated at St. Anthony’s and the Basilica of St. John by Msgr. Chiodo, Fr. Chicoine, Fr. Dolan, Fr. Cassian, and Fr. Benedict.

Here are some images:

Each day has indications for the liturgical calendar in both Extraordinary and Ordinary Forms, as well as abstinence or fast symbols.  Note that under each day of the week there is a theme which is traditionally observed.

There’s an entire page on spiritual fasting and the symbols that each day indicate.

Yes, friends, it looks like this:

Proceeds benefit Una Voce Des Moines and the continued promotion of the Traditional Mass throughout Central Iowa.  Be sure to share with your friends and family, but order quickly as Christmas is in a few weeks and we have a limited supply!

Calendars are $20 a piece (additional cost for shipping TBD).

Can be purchased through PayPal or make a check payable to “Una Voce Des Moines” or give us a check at Sunday Mass. SOLD OUT

For more information, email Bryan @ info@unavocedsm.org or call/text 812.686.6102.

Attendance Increases, Average Age Decreases at St. Anthony TLM

Since the Traditional Latin Mass has moved upstairs in Sept 2017, we have seen a 140% increase in mass attendance, while the average age (as estimated during July 2019) is 28.6 years old.  

Many young people are serving, sure, but we have many young families with young children praying weekly in the pews.  

If you are interested in learning more about the Traditional Latin Mass, or maybe you want to explore if it’s a good option for your children’s religious formation, join us on a Sunday at 5pm, and be sure to read this article before you attend.

Traditional Baptism

In March 2019, the Chapel at Mercy College of Health Science had its first Traditional Baptism!

Thanks to Fr. Windschitl for welcoming Baby Helena into Church!

Mass with Bishop Pates

On December 2, 2018, +His Excellency, Bishop Pates, joined the Traditional Latin Mass Community for our weekly celebration and our monthly potluck.

It was an honor for us to have him join us, and we appreciate that he has allowed us to celebrate this weekly since 2007.  He preached and sat in choir, and it was the first time – to our knowledge – that a +Bishop has joined us for the Sunday celebration.

Ad multos annos, +Bishop Pates, and many blessings in retirement!

Traditional Baptism

Back in January 2019, a local family baptized their newborn according to the ancient baptismal rite at St. Augustin’s by the Reverend Christopher Pisut.  

This marks 5 different local diocesan churches which have celebrated the Traditional Baptismal Rite in the past 12 months:  St. Anthony’s, Basilica of St. John, St. Augustin, St. Theresa, and Mercy College of Health Science Chapel.

If you are interested in having your child baptized, reach out to Una Voce Des Moines, and we can assist in preparing the priest and a booklet for you.

First-Hand Account: Traditional Baptism

Baptism. 

It is my favorite sacrament, as it is the basis of Christian life, opening the door to the other sacraments, especially the Blessed Sacrament of the Eucharist.  

As the father of a large family, a member of an even larger family, and a member of very close-knit parish communities everywhere we’ve lived, I have participated in many baptisms as a father, a godfather, or as a witness. 

With joy, I cry at every one of them, knowing that the catechumen is being born into Christ’s Church a new person, cleansed in preparation for eventually entering into the Kingdom of God.

Together with my wife, we have 11 children, 9 on this earth.  We have celebrated each of children’s baptisms with the same joy and anticipation. 

But something different occurred with this most recent celebration.  Eight of our children were baptized in the Ordinary Form (OF), and having participated in so many baptisms, it has become a very familiar rite. 

Recently we have been attending a Mass celebrated in the Extraordinary Form (EF) of the Roman Rite, and we have fallen deeply in love with this liturgy.  After our ninth child was born, we asked if our daughter could be baptized according to that traditional baptismal ritual. 

Once again, we have fallen in love.  In a special way, the Traditional Baptism highlights what the sacrament is, and – just as importantly – the significance of the godparents. 

The use of the prayers of exorcism remind us that Baptism indeed serves as an exorcism, and highlights the reality of evil in this world.

The use of the exorcised salt brings an imagination of how the Saints of our Church celebrated this sacrament.  This occurs prior to entering into the main part of the church.  The seriousness of the sacrament is also highlighted by the changing of stoles, with violet being used at the beginning, and changing once we moved into the church to prepare for the anointing with the Oil of Catechumens.

But what really stood out to us was the role of the godparents, or the sponsors, and how the questions are addressed.  The sponsors, not the parents, are asked what it is they are asking of the Church.  And the answer of faith is given by them directly. 

Then, the questions become directed to the catechumen, and being an infant, the sponsors again have the responsibility of answering on her behalf.  And, instead of the parents, the godparents were brought into the Sanctuary. My brother and sister-in-law were just as impressed as we were at how the Traditional Baptism highlights the seriousness of their role as godparents. 

A final observation that impressed me is how friendly the EF is regarding Baptism to those who are not familiar with it.  The Priest gently guided us through everything, and the flow was very natural.

Darren Manthei resides just outside of Des Moines with his wife and children.

Traditional Triduum Update

The schedule for the Traditional Liturgies during Holy Week is posted.  We wish you and yours a blessed Triduum and joyful Easter.
A few additional notes:  

  • We had a wonderful showing for the Saturday evening and Sunday morning lectures for Dr. Denis McNamara the weekend of March 23/24th.  His presentations on Church Architecture were so important in our times, and then to see the worldwide reaction to Monday’s tragedy in Paris (see these stunning images!) gave me a sense that deep down inside, people have a longing for beautiful church architecture.  Pray for the people of Paris — and for the world — that McNamara’s work may continue to influence architects to a return to the classical approach.  (N.B. Thanks to those who helped financially support the event, especially a recent donor who helped us break even with a generous $400 donation!)

  • For those who are parishioners at St. Anthony’s, the Annual Diocesan Appeal is ongoing.  It’s important to show our support of Msgr. Chiodo, St. Anthony’s, and the Traditional Latin Mass community that we participate.  If you’ve not already done so, please consider a gift to the ADA.  If you do, write something like “TLM” or “Latin Mass” in the memo line, or write a note that says, “I support the Extraordinary Form” in a letter to let both the Diocese and St. Anthony know that we are doing our part.


  • On Sunday, May 5th, you are cordially invited to the First Holy Communions of four of our children.  It is in conjunction with the 1st Sunday of the month potluck, so nothing is different, other than the potluck will be in the parish hall (ie, the gym), since we anticipate more people to celebrate the 1st Communions of Antonia, Matthew, John Paul, and Damien.
altarrail.JPG
  • Finally, Una Voce Des Moines has a unique opportunity to participate in extending the altar rail at St. Anthony’s!  St. Anthony’s has benefactors funding the rail itself (as I understand it, it won’t go across the entire entrance of the sanctuary, but close).  To underscore the importance of the communion rail to our traditional style of worship, Una Voce Des Moines has agreed to fund the padding for kneeling, so that the faithful can more reverently receive the Eucharist.  This padding is estimated to be $500, and we are encouraging you — after you’ve made your donation to the ADA! — to assist Una Voce Des Moines with a financial contribution to this noble project of adding reverence to the Holy Mass at St. Anthony’s.

The officers and I plan on being around at the Holy Week liturgies, if you have any questions about these projects/events. 

With gratitude for your service to Our Lord in the traditional expression of liturgical worship throughout central Iowa, we wish you a joyful Eastertide!

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