Una Voce Des Moines

Promoting the Traditional Latin Mass in Central Iowa

Can Your Kids Handle the Latin Mass?

(Article taken from an interview conducted by Regina Magazine with Dr. Joseph Shaw, Chairman of the Latin Mass Society of England and Wales.)

By Anna-Maria Vesey

Some of REGINA’s readers don’t attend a Traditional Latin Mass, but are, well, curious. Many are keen to experience for themselves why it is that so many young people and families are enthusiastic about this ancient Mass.

But something is holding them back. Often, Catholics with kids wonder: if they struggle with misbehaving children at a Novus Ordo Mass, won’t their kids be too noisy, fidgety, distracted or even unwelcome at a Latin Mass? 

REGINA’s Anna-Maria Vesey recently sat down to discuss this hot topic with a man who is eminently qualified to respond. Not only is he the head of the Latin Mass Society of England and Wales, but Oxford University professor Joseph Shaw is the hands-on father of seven young children.

REGINA: With all its formality, are children welcome at the Traditional Latin Mass?

JOSEPH SHAW: There is such a thing as hostility to families and children in some churches, but this is much more common at the Ordinary Form than it is at the Traditional Mass, where there is a noticeably higher proportion of children present. This is partly because of larger families, and partly because the Traditional Mass is sought out by young parents. The sour looks and tut-tutting one gets as a parent trying to manage small children at Mass generally come from people, usually lay people but occasionally priests, who aren’t used to seeing children at Mass. People who go regularly to the TLM are that much more likely to be used to them.

REGINA: What do you say to parents with young children who are considering attending a Latin Mass?

JOSEPH SHAW: So my first message to parents is that you’ll find more fellow-feeling and sympathy at the Latin Mass than you may be used to at your usual parish Mass, especially if your parish has tried to push children into a sort of kiddies’ ghetto, with ‘children’s Masses,’, ‘children’s liturgy’, and ‘crying rooms’. These things have the effect of making many parishes’ main Masses children-free zones.

REGINA: “Kiddies’ ghetto”?

JOSEPH SHAW: Yes. In the kiddies’ ghetto itself you get not tut-tutting but, all too often, a feeling by many of the children, and even some of their parents, that there is no need to make any effort to maintain a prayerful atmosphere. In that situation children are never going to learn what kind of behaviour is appropriate at Mass.

REGINA: What do you suggest, instead?

JOSEPH SHAW: The ideal situation, to help parents teach their children how to behave appropriately, is a Mass where there is an atmosphere to pick up on and examples to follow: not a zoo-like atmosphere, not a church full of tut-tutting old people, and not behind a sound-proof glass screen.

REGINA: How should one prepare to engage with the Latin liturgy for the first time?

JOSEPH SHAW:   There is nothing special you need to do. The liturgy is not a test for which you should study: it is an experience. If you want to get the most out of it, you may want to learn more about it, but you have to have the experience first, and you have to have it repeatedly.

REGINA: And the children?

JOSEPH SHAW:   Children’s general education in the Faith, at home and at school, will help, but they should be getting this whatever kind of Mass you are attending.

First, children should be taking part in family prayers. If you want to teach children to get used to kneeling and being quiet and recollected, ten minutes’ practice a day is a lot more effective than an hour once a week.

Secondly, every catechism and Religious Instruction course includes material on the nature of the Mass and the other sacraments. Some catechisms and courses do this better than others, naturally.

REGINA: And what about the music?

JOSEPH SHAW:   It is probably too much to expect your friendly local Catholic school to teach your children Latin and Gregorian Chant, but it should be: they are every Western Catholic’s birthright.

REGINA: How do we learn about what’s going on in a Latin Mass?

JOSEPH SHAW:   If you do make the Latin Mass your regular Mass, there are lots of excellent books available for children of different ages to look at during Mass, and to read and have read to them at home. They will help your children (and perhaps you too) to understand more exactly what is happening at each stage, and what the ceremonies signify. As the children grow older there are hand missals with the readings and other texts for each Mass, prayers for personal use, and beautiful pictures.

REGINA: Sounds lovely!

JOSEPH SHAW:   I would not wish to place too much emphasis on these books, however. One does not go to church in order to read a book: one can do that at home. We attend Mass in order to take part in the Mass, which means looking at what is happening, and listening to the chants, in a spirit of prayerful contemplation. You can’t teach your children prayerful contemplation from a book. The Mass will teach it to them: as Pope Benedict said, the liturgy is a school of prayer.

REGINA: What would you advise anyone thinking about attending the Traditional Mass for the first time?

JOSEPH SHAW:   If you have the choice, go to a Sung Mass. Low Mass is a wonderful experience, but it takes more getting used to. The music at Sung Mass, if it is done well, adds an extra level of beauty to the Mass, and an extra way to engage with it. If they are singing Chant, children attending regularly can with a little encouragement easily learn the ‘Ordinary’ Chants (Kyrie, Sanctus, Agnus) and join in.

REGINA: What advice would you give parents to help them keep their children focused whilst at the Mass?

JOSEPH SHAW:   What parents need to do, and do actually do, is not any different in the Traditional Mass, though the Traditional Mass offers some advantages in doing it.

Infants in Mass just need to be happy, or asleep, if they are not to disturb their parents and others, and if they are unhappy because they need something, parents do their best to give it to them. Sometimes what they need is a breath of fresh air, so you take them outside.

When they are a bit older, as toddlers, they can play with toys, stickers, or colouring in. When they are older still, you can start pointing out key moments in the Mass to them, like the Consecration. This becomes more important as they prepare for First Holy Communion, for which they’ll also be getting some preparation outside Mass. Gradually, they start attending to the Mass in the way that adults do. When they can read fluently, they can benefit from books already mentioned. To repeat, this is the same whatever Form the Mass is, and parents shouldn’t imagine that there are any special problems or requirements at the Traditional Mass.

REGINA: What is different about the Traditional Mass in terms of the parents’ job, whatever the age of their children?

JOSEPH SHAW:   It’s easier.

REGINA: Really?

JOSEPH SHAW:   For the youngest children, being calm and quiet is easier because they are in a calm and quiet environment, and parents often say that their young children behave better at the Latin Mass. In one of his columns in the UK’s Catholic Herald, Fr Tim Finigan addressed parents’ question about how to encourage their young children to be quiet in Mass, with the simple advice: ‘Take them to a quieter Mass.’

REGINA: Some may call that counter-intuitive for small children.

JOSEPH SHAW:   There is an attitude that, because one can never guarantee one’s children won’t make any noise, they will disturb people more at a quiet Mass, so parents with small children belong at a noisy Mass where they won’t make things much worse than they already are.

This is a counsel of despair. Teachers get children, eventually, to be quiet in class; parents teach their children to behave at their grandparents’; you have to stop your children climbing the rigging when on a ferry. Children learn these things because they must. Mass is no different.

REGINA: And when they get older?

JOSEPH SHAW:   When you want to start pointing things out to older children, then the Traditional Mass has another great advantage: the ceremonies are much more dramatic and expressive than in the Novus Ordo. The traditional Consecration, with its associated genuflections, elevations, bells, and incense, developed at a time when lay Catholics went infrequently to Communion, and it is designed to facilitate a participation in Holy Communion not only by physical reception but by looking, gazing, and by an interior intention. Thus it is ideally suited to children who haven’t yet had their First Communion. Parents can encourage their children to make an interior act of Faith (‘My Lord and my God’), and a formal or informal Spiritual Communion at this point, or when the priest receives.

REGINA: Ah, yes. There does seem to be more drama, if that’s the right word.

JOSEPH SHAW:   There are many other dramatic and expressive moments in Mass which parents can point out, such as the genuflections in the Creed and the Last Gospel, and when the priest shows the congregation the consecrated host (‘Ecce Agnus Dei’). There is no need to draw children’s attention to everything every time: you can just point some out every now and then. Children, like adults, must be allowed to participate in the Mass with their own thoughts and prayers.

REGINA: People may wonder what children can get out of the Latin verbiage and complex ceremonies which they will be experiencing in the Traditional Mass?

JOSEPH SHAW:   They certainly don’t get much out of the vernacular texts they experience at the Ordinary Form. From the laity’s point of view, this resembles a lecture: a torrent of words. Something less calculated to engage children’s attention would be difficult to imagine. Children naturally have limited verbal skills, and even adults struggle to pay attention and to understand a long text delivered orally. The multiplicity of options and the multi-year lectionary are designed to prevent many of these texts becoming familiar, in case they would be boring, but this again makes them harder to follow.

REGINA: Yes, that’s an interesting point. The Novus Ordo IS very focused on talking.

JOSEPH SHAW:   The difficulty here is that the vernacular Mass attempts to do almost all its communication using words. The Traditional Mass communicates through a full range of means, using atmosphere, beautiful and complex vestments and church furnishings, visually striking ceremonies, incense, special forms of music, and above all the dignity and beauty of a sacred language, to convey the central message of the liturgy: the supernatural importance and dignity of Sacrament and Sacrifice. Since you can’t get all that much through to children using words alone, this means the ancient Mass has a considerable advantage.

REGINA: You have written about the role of altar boys in the TLM. Does their presence have any effect on the male children attending, do you think?

JOSEPH SHAW:   Another advantage the Traditional Mass has is in relation to boys serving. This is not so attractive in the Ordinary Form, where servers do not play such an important or interesting role, and where serving has in many places become a very female-dominated activity. At the Traditional Mass it can have an extraordinary effect on little boys, who can find it more difficult than girls to sit still and quiet in the congregation for long periods. The discipline of serving, and its close involvement with the ceremonies, gives them a new angle on Mass, and they often become rather enthusiastic about it.

REGINA: Any final words?

JOSEPH SHAW:   What is most important, however, is not how many facts children know about the Mass, or even about the catechism, but the encounter with God which the liturgy makes possible.

Day of Recollection a Success!

Many thanks to Fr. Cassian of the Benedictine Monks of Norcia for joining Una Voce Des Moines for our kickoff event on Saturday, Sept 30th at the Basilica of St. John in Des Moines, Iowa!

Here are some photos of the event (courtesy of Lisa Bourne)!  Some audio and text are (possibly) forthcoming.

Here was the schedule of the event, and we had a great turnout!  More than 100 guests joined us for the Day of Recollection, more than 150 for Mass (the first TLM at the Basilica of St. John’s in 25 years), and then we finished the day with Monastic None.  Thanks for all who drove from far and wide — we had guests from 7 states, including a few seminarians!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ember Days: The Four Seasons Fast

The ember days – Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday – were prescribed for the Church by Pope Gregory VII as days of prayer and fasting for the gifts of nature, to teach men to make use of them in moderation, and to assist the needy.  (See  “The Catholic Encyclopedia“)

Ember Days occur four times a year, corresponding to the four seasons.  The winter Ember Days occur on the Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday following the Feast of St. Lucy on December 13.  The Spring Ember Days follow Ash Wednesday.  The Fall Ember Days follow the Feast of the Exultation of the Holy Cross on September 14.  The Summer Ember Days follow Pentecost.

These dates are given in the following Latin mnemonic:

          Dant Crux, Lucia, Cineres, Charismata Dia
          Ut sit in angariâ quarta sequens feria

Or in an old English rhyme

“Fasting days and Emberings be
Lent, Whitsun, Holyrood, and Lucie.”

Jacobus de Voragine tells us that we fast on Ember Days in part to atone for faults that correspond to the character of the seasons:

“Spring is warm and humid, summer hot and dry, autumn cool and dry, winter cold and wet.  Therefore we fast in the spring to control the harmful fluid of voluptuousness in us; in summer, to allay the noxious heat of avarice; in autumn, to temper the aridity of pride; in winter, to overcome the coldness of malice and lack of faith.”  Jacobus de Voragine, The Golden Legend.  

The Code of Canon Law of 1983 no longer requires the observance of the Ember Days fast, and the reform of the Roman Calendar in 1969 left them to the discretion of local ordinaries.  Nevertheless, personal observance of Ember Days in Catholic homes, especially in an agricultural state like Iowa, helps to connect us with the rich liturgical tradition of the Church.

Day of Recollection: Sept 30th: Fr. Cassian Folsom, OSB

Day of Recollection

Una Voce Des Moines is proud to welcome Fr. Cassian Folsom, OSB to Des Moines on Saturday, Sept 30th for a day of recollection.

His conferences will focus on presenting a basic understanding of the Extraordinary Form (also known as Traditional Latin Mass, Tridentine Latin Mass, usus antiquior, or the old mass).

Please RSVP (info@unavocedsm.org) so we have a number of participants for food and beverage, as well as any materials that Fr. Cassian will want to prepare ahead of time.

We look forward to this unique opportunity, too, to celebrate a Missa Cantata in a minor basilica, the Basilica of St. John.

If you’re interested in helping sponsor the event or underwriting Fr. Cassian’s travels & honorarium, please contact: info@unavocedsm.org, or write us below:

 

Happy Anniversary, Summorum Pontificum!

On Sunday, July 16th, Una Voce Des Moines and St. Anthony’s Catholic Church celebrated the 10th anniversary of Summorum Pontificum.  Here are some photos of a solemn high mass with the following servants:

Priest:              Rev. Msgr. Frank Chiodo
Deacon:           Rev. Guthrie Dolan
Subdeacon:    Mr. Andy Milam

Afterwards, the community enjoyed fellowship and food at a potluck serving the nearly 200 in attendance!

Photos courtesy of Lisa Bourne and JLV Photos.

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Solemnity of the Assumption

Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Join us on the Feast of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary!

Mass @ 7pm according to the Extraordinary Form in the upper church of St. Anthony’s in Des Moines, Iowa.

Here’s a flyer you can print, forward, or pass around to your friends and family!

New TLM Time & Location Starting Sept 3rd

New Mass Time
New Mass Location
Same Beautiful Form

The Traditional Latin Mass is moving to the Main Church!

Join us on Sunday evenings at 5pm for the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite in the Main Church at St. Anthony’s Catholic Church.

**Starting September 3**

2017.09.03.MassChangesC

 

Happy Anniversary, Summorum Pontificum!

In honor of Friday’s 10th Anniversary of Pope Emeritus Benedict’s 2007 motu proprio, Summorum Pontificum, we publish here the text from a speech delivered by Robert Cardinal Sarah, Prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, a message sent to the Colloquium “The Source of the Future” (“Quelle der Zukunft”) in March 2017 in Herzogenrath, near Aachen, Germany.

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Introductory Message

First of all I wish to thank from the bottom of my heart the organizers of the Colloquium entitled “The Source of the Future” on the occasion of the tenth anniversary of the Motu proprio Summorum Pontificum by Pope Benedict XVI, in Herzogenrath, for allowing me to offer an introduction to your reflections on this subject, which is so important for the life of the Church and, more particularly, for the future of the Liturgy; I do so with great joy. I would like to greet very cordially all the participants in this Colloquium, particularly the members of the following associations whose names are mentioned on the invitation that you so kindly sent me, and I hope that I do not forget any: Una Voce Germany; The Catholic Circle of the Priests and Laity of the Archdioceses of Hamburg and Cologne; The Cardinal Newman Association; the Network of the priests of Saint Gertrude Parish in Herzogenrath. As I wrote to the Rev. Father Guido Rodheudt, pastor of Saint Gertrude Parish in Herzogenrath, I am very sorry that I had to forgo participating in your Colloquium because of obligations that came up unexpectedly and were added to a schedule that was already very busy. Nevertheless, be assured that I will be among you through prayer: it will accompany you every day, and of course you will all be present at the offertory of the daily Holy Mass that I will celebrate during the four days of your Colloquium, from March 29 to April 1. I will therefore start off your proceedings to the best of my ability with a brief reflection on the way that the Motu proprio Summorum Pontificum should be applied in unity and peace.

As you know, what was called “the liturgical movement” in the early twentieth century was the intention of Pope Saint Pius X, expressed in another Motu proprio entitled Tra le sollicitudini (1903), to restore the liturgy so as to make its treasures more accessible, so that it might also become again the source of authentically Christian life. Hence the definition of the liturgy as “summit and source of the life and mission of the Church” found in the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy Sacrosanctum Concilium of Vatican Council II (see n. 10). And it can never be repeated often enough that the Liturgy, as summit and source of the Church, has its foundation in Christ Himself. In fact, Our Lord Jesus Christ is the sole and definitive High Priest of the New and Eternal Covenant, since He offered Himself in sacrifice, and “by a single offering He has perfected for all time those whom He sanctifies” (cf. Heb 10:14). Thus as the Catechism of the Catholic Church declares, “It is this mystery of Christ that the Church proclaims and celebrates in her liturgy so that the faithful may live from it and bear witness to it in the world” (n. 1068). This “liturgical movement”, one of the finest fruits of which was the Constitution Sacrosanctum Concilium, is the context in which we ought to consider the Motu proprio Summorum Pontificum dated July 7, 2007; we are happy to celebrate this year with great joy and thanksgiving the tenth anniversary of its promulgation.

We can say therefore that the “liturgical movement” initiated by Pope Saint Pius X was never interrupted, and that it still continues in our days following the new impetus given to it by Pope Benedict XVI. On this subject we might mention the particular care and personal attention that he showed in celebrating the Sacred Liturgy as Pope, and then the frequent references in his speeches to its centrality in the life of the Church, and finally his two Magisterial documents Sacramentum Caritatis and Summorum Pontificum. In other words, what is called liturgical aggiornamento1 was in a way completed by the Motu proprio Summorum Pontificum by Pope Benedict XVI. What was it about? The Pope emeritus made the distinction between two forms of the same Roman rite: a so-called “ordinary” form, referring to the liturgical texts of the Roman Missal as revised following the guidelines of Vatican Council II, and a form designated “extraordinary” that corresponds to the liturgy that was in use before the liturgical aggiornamento. Thus, presently, in the Roman or Latin rite, two missals are in force: that of Blessed Pope Paul VI, the third edition of which is dated 2002, and that of Saint Pius V, the last edition of which, promulgated by Saint John XXIII, goes back to 1962.

In his Letter to the Bishops that accompanied the Motu proprio, Pope Benedict XVI clearly explained that the purpose for his decision to have the two missals coexist was not only to satisfy the wishes of certain groups of the faithful who are attached to the liturgical forms prior to the Second Vatican Council, but also to allow for the mutual enrichment of the two forms of the same Roman rite, in other words, not only their peaceful coexistence but also the possibility of perfecting them by emphasizing the best features that characterize them. He wrote in particular that “the two Forms of the usage of the Roman rite can be mutually enriching: new Saints and some of the new Prefaces can and should be inserted in the old Missal….  The celebration of the Mass according to the Missal of Paul VI will be able to demonstrate, more powerfully than has been the case hitherto, the sacrality which attracts many people to the former usage.” These then are the terms in which the Pope emeritus expressed his desire to re-launch the “liturgical movement”. In parishes where it has been possible to implement the Motu proprio, pastors testify to the greater fervor both in the faithful and in the priests, as Father Rodheudt himself can bear witness. They have also noted a repercussion and a positive spiritual development in the way of experiencing Eucharistic liturgies according to the Ordinary Form, particularly the rediscovery of postures expressing adoration of the Blessed Sacrament: kneeling, genuflection, etc., and also greater recollection characterized by the sacred silence that should mark the important moments of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass, so as to allow the priests and the faithful to interiorize the mystery of faith that is being celebrated.

It is true also that liturgical and spiritual formation must be encouraged and promoted. Similarly, it will be necessary to promote a thoroughly revised pedagogy in order to get beyond an excessively formal “rubricism” in explaining the rites of the Tridentine Missal to those who are not yet familiar with it, or who are only partly acquainted with it…and sometimes not impartially. To do that, it is urgently necessary to finalize a bilingual Latin-vernacular missal to allow for full, conscious, intimate and more fruitful participation of the lay faithful in Eucharistic celebrations.

It is also very important to emphasize the continuity between the two missals by appropriate liturgical catecheses…. Many priests testify that this is a stimulating task, because they are conscious of working for the liturgical renewal, of contributing their own efforts to the “liturgical movement” that we were just talking about, in other words, in reality, to this mystical and spiritual renewal that is therefore missionary in character, which was intended by the Second Vatican Council, to which Pope Francis is vigorously calling us. The liturgy must therefore always be reformed so as to be more faithful to its mystical essence. But most of the time, this “reform” that replaced the genuine “restoration” intended by the Second Vatican Council was carried out in a superficial spirit and on the basis of only one criterion: to suppress at all costs a heritage that must be perceived as totally negative and outmoded so as to excavate a gulf between the time before and the time after the Council. Now it is enough to pick up the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy again and to read it honestly, without betraying its meaning, to see that the true purpose of the Second Vatican Council was not to start a reform that could become the occasion for a break with Tradition, but quite the contrary, to rediscover and to confirm Tradition in its deepest meaning. In fact, what is called “the reform of the reform”, which perhaps ought to be called more precisely “the mutual enrichment of the rites”, to use an expression from the Magisterium of Benedict XVI, is a primarily spiritual necessity. And it quite obviously concerns the two forms of the Roman rite. The particular care that should be brought to the liturgy, the urgency of holding it in high esteem and working for its beauty, its sacral character and keeping the right balance between fidelity to Tradition and legitimate development, and therefore rejecting absolutely and radically any hermeneutic of discontinuity or rupture: these essential elements are the heart of all authentic Christian liturgy. Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger tirelessly repeated that the crisis that has shaken the Church for fifty years, chiefly since Vatican Council II, is connected with the crisis of the liturgy, and therefore to the lack of respect, the desacralization and the leveling of the essential elements of divine worship. “I am convinced,” he writes, “that the crisis in the Church that we are experiencing today is to a large extent due to the disintegration of the liturgy.”2

Certainly, the Second Vatican Council wished to promote greater active participation by the people of God and to bring about progress day by day in the Christian life of the faithful (see Sacrosanctum Concilium, n. 1). Certainly, some fine initiatives were taken along these lines. However we cannot close our eyes to the disaster, the devastation and the schism that the modern promoters of a living liturgy caused by remodeling the Church’s liturgy according to their ideas. They forgot that the liturgical act is not just a PRAYER, but also and above all a MYSTERY in which something is accomplished for us that we cannot fully understand but that we must accept and receive in faith, love, obedience and adoring silence. And this is the real meaning of active participation of the faithful. It is not about exclusively external activity, the distribution of roles or of functions in the liturgy, but rather about an intensely active receptivity: this reception is, in Christ and with Christ, the humble offering of oneself in silent prayer and a thoroughly contemplative attitude. The serious crisis of faith, not only at the level of the Christian faithful but also and especially among many priests and bishops, has made us incapable of understanding the Eucharistic liturgy as a sacrifice, as identical to the act performed once and for all by Jesus Christ, making present the Sacrifice of the Cross in a non-bloody manner, throughout the Church, through different ages, places, peoples and nations. There is often a sacrilegious tendency to reduce the Holy Mass to a simple convivial meal, the celebration of a profane feast, the community’s celebration of itself, or even worse, a terrible diversion from the anguish of a life that no longer has meaning or from the fear of meeting God face to face, because His glance unveils and obliges us to look truly and unflinchingly at the ugliness of our interior life. But the Holy Mass is not a diversion. It is the living sacrifice of Christ who died on the cross to free us from sin and death, for the purpose of revealing the love and the glory of God the Father. Many Catholics do not know that the final purpose of every liturgical celebration is the glory and adoration of God, the salvation and sanctification of human beings, since in the liturgy “God is perfectly glorified and men are sanctified” (Sacrosanctum Concilium, n. 7). Most of the faithful—including priests and bishops—do not know this teaching of the Council. Just as they do not know that the true worshippers of God are not those who reform the liturgy according to their own ideas and creativity, to make it something pleasing to the world, but rather those who reform the world in depth with the Gospel so as to allow it access to a liturgy that is the reflection of the liturgy that is celebrated from all eternity in the heavenly Jerusalem. As Benedict XVI often emphasized, at the root of the liturgy is adoration, and therefore God. Hence it is necessary to recognize that the serious, profound crisis that has affected the liturgy and the Church itself since the Council is due to the fact that its CENTER is no longer God and the adoration of Him, but rather men and their alleged ability to “do” something to keep themselves busy during the Eucharistic celebrations. Even today, a significant number of Church leaders underestimate the serious crisis that the Church is going through: relativism in doctrinal, moral and disciplinary teaching, grave abuses, the desacralization and trivialization of the Sacred Liturgy, a merely social and horizontal view of the Church’s mission.

Many believe and declare loud and long that Vatican Council II brought about a true springtime in the Church. Nevertheless, a growing number of Church leaders see this “springtime” as a rejection, a renunciation of her centuries-old heritage, or even as a radical questioning of her past and Tradition. Political Europe is rebuked for abandoning or denying its Christian roots. But the first to have abandoned her Christian roots and past is indisputably the post-conciliar Catholic Church. Some episcopal conferences even refuse to translate faithfully the original Latin text of the Roman Missal. Some claim that each local Church can translate the Roman Missal, not according to the sacred heritage of the Church, following the methods and principles indicated by Liturgiam authenticam, but according to the fantasies, ideologies and cultural expressions which, they say, can be understood and accepted by the people. But the people desire to be initiated into the sacred language of God. The Gospel and revelation themselves are “reinterpreted”, “contextualized” and adapted to decadent Western culture. In 1968, the Bishop of Metz, in France, wrote in his diocesan newsletter a horrible, outrageous thing that seemed like the desire for and expression of a complete break with the Church’s past. According to that bishop, today we must rethink the very concept of the salvation brought by Jesus Christ, because the apostolic Church and the Christian communities in the early centuries of Christianity had understood nothing of the Gospel. Only in our era has the plan of salvation brought by Jesus been understood. Here is the audacious, surprising statement by the Bishop of Metz:

The transformation of the world (change of civilization) teaches and demands a change in the very concept of the salvation brought by Jesus Christ; this transformation reveals to us that the Church’s thinking about God’s plan was, before the present change, insufficiently evangelical…. No era has been as capable as ours of understanding the evangelical ideal of fraternal life.3

With a vision like that, it is not surprising that devastation, destruction and wars have followed and persisted these days at the liturgical, doctrinal and moral level, because they claim that no era has been capable of understanding the “evangelical ideal” as well as ours. Many refuse to face up to the Church’s work of self-destruction through the deliberate demolition of her doctrinal, liturgical, moral and pastoral foundations. While more and more voices of high-ranking prelates stubbornly affirm obvious doctrinal, moral and liturgical errors that have been condemned a hundred times and work to demolish the little faith remaining in the people of God, while the bark of the Church furrows the stormy sea of this decadent world and the waves crash down on the ship, so that it is already filling with water, a growing number of Church leaders and faithful shout: “Tout va très bien, Madame la Marquise!” [“Everything is just fine, Milady,” the refrain of a popular comic song from the 1930’s, in which the employees of a noblewoman report to her a series of catastrophes]. But the reality is quite different: in fact, as Cardinal Ratzinger said:

What the Popes and the Council Fathers were expecting was a new Catholic unity, and instead one has encountered a dissension which—to use the words of Paul VI—seems to have passed over from self-criticism to self-destruction. There had been the expectation of a new enthusiasm, and instead too often it has ended in boredom and discouragement. There had been the expectation of a step forward, and instead one found oneself facing a progressive process of decadence that to a large measure has been unfolding under the sign of a summons to a presumed “spirit of the Council” and by so doing has actually and increasingly discredited it.4

“No one can seriously deny the critical manifestations” and liturgy wars that Vatican Council II led to.5Today they have gone on to fragment and demolish the sacred Missale Romanum by abandoning it to experiments in cultural diversity and compilers of liturgical texts. Here I am happy to congratulate the tremendous, marvelous work accomplished, through Vox Clara, by the English-language Episcopal Conferences, by the Spanish- and Korean-language Episcopal Conferences, etc., which have faithfully translated the Missale Romanum in perfect conformity with the guidelines and principles of Liturgiam authenticam, and the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments has granted them the recognitio [approval].

Following the publication of my book God or Nothing, people have asked me about the “liturgy wars” which for decades have too often divided Catholics. I stated that that is an aberration, because the liturgy is the field par excellence in which Catholics ought to experience unity in the truth, in faith and in love, and consequently that it is inconceivable to celebrate the liturgy while having in one’s heart feelings of fratricidal struggle and rancor. Besides, did Jesus not speak very demanding words about the need to go and be reconciled with one’s brother before presenting his own sacrifice at the altar? (See Mt 5:23-24.)

The liturgy in its turn moves the faithful, filled with “the paschal sacraments,” to be “one in holiness”6; it prays that “they may hold fast in their lives to what they have grasped by their faith”; the renewal in the Eucharist of the covenant between the Lord and man draws the faithful into the compelling love of Christ and sets them on fire. From the liturgy, therefore, and especially from the Eucharist, as from a font, grace is poured forth upon us; and the sanctification of men in Christ and the glorification of God, to which all other activities of the Church are directed as toward their end, is achieved in the most efficacious possible way. (Sacrosanctum Concilium, n. 10)

In this “face-to-face encounter” with God, which the liturgy is, our heart must be pure of all enmity, which presupposes that everyone must be respected with his own sensibility. This means concretely that, although it must be reaffirmed that Vatican Council II never asked to make tabula rasa of the past and therefore to abandon the Missal said to be of Saint Pius V, which produced so many saints, not to mention three such admirable priests as Saint John Vianney, the Curé of Ars, Saint Pius of Pietrelcina (Padre Pio) and Saint Josemaría Escrivá de Balaguer, at the same time it is essential to promote the liturgical renewal intended by that same Council, and therefore the liturgical books were updated following the Constitution Sacrosanctum Concilium, in particular the Missal said to be of Blessed Pope Paul VI. And I added that what is important above all, whether one is celebrating in the Ordinary or the Extraordinary Form, is to bring to the faithful something that they have a right to: the beauty of the liturgy, its sacrality, silence, recollection, the mystical dimension and adoration. The liturgy should put us face to face with God in a personal relationship of intense intimacy. It should plunge us into the inner life of the Most Holy Trinity. Speaking of the usus antiquior (the older form of the Mass) in his Letter that accompanies Summorum Pontificum, Pope Benedict XVI said that

Immediately after the Second Vatican Council it was presumed that requests for the use of the 1962 Missal would be limited to the older generation which had grown up with it, but in the meantime it has clearly been demonstrated that young persons too have discovered this liturgical form, felt its attraction and found in it a form of encounter with the Mystery of the Most Holy Eucharist, particularly suited to them.

This is an unavoidable reality, a true sign of our times. When young people are absent from the holy Liturgy, we must ask ourselves: Why? We must make sure that the celebrations according to the usus recentior (the newer form of the Mass) facilitate this encounter too, that they lead people on the path of the via pulchritudinis (the way of beauty) that leads through her sacred rites to the living Christ and to the work within His Church today. Indeed, the Eucharist is not a sort of “dinner among friends”, a convivial meal of the community, but rather a sacred Mystery, the great Mystery of our faith, the celebration of the Redemption accomplished by Our Lord Jesus Christ, the commemoration of the death of Jesus on the cross to free us from our sins. It is therefore appropriate to celebrate Holy Mass with the beauty and fervor of the saintly Curé of Ars, of Padre Pio or Saint Josemaría, and this is the sine qua non condition for arriving at a liturgical reconciliation “by the high road”, if I may put it that way.7 I vehemently refuse therefore to waste our time pitting one liturgy against another, or the Missal of Saint Pius V against that of Blessed Paul VI. Rather, it is a question of entering into the great silence of the liturgy, by allowing ourselves to be enriched by all the liturgical forms, whether they are Latin or Eastern. Indeed, without this mystical dimension of silence and without a contemplative spirit, the liturgy will remain an occasion for hateful divisions, ideological confrontations and the public humiliation of the weak by those who claim to hold some authority, instead of being the place of our unity and communion in the Lord. Thus, instead of being an occasion for confronting and hating each other, the liturgy should bring us all together to unity in the faith and to the true knowledge of the Son of God, to mature manhood, to the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ… and, by living in the truth of love, we will grow into Christ so as to be raised up in all things to Him who is the Head (cf. Eph 4:13-15).8

As you know, the great German liturgist Msgr. Klaus Gamber (1919-1989) used the word Heimat to designate this common home or “little homeland” of Catholics gathered around the altar of the Holy Sacrifice. The sense of the sacred that imbues and irrigates the rites of the Church is the inseparable correlative of the liturgy. Now in recent decades, many, many of the faithful have been ill treated or profoundly troubled by celebrations marked with a superficial, devastating subjectivism, to the point where they did not recognize their Heimat, their common home, whereas the youngest among them had never known it! How many have tiptoed away, particularly the least significant and the poorest among them! They have become in a way “liturgically stateless persons”. The “liturgical movement”, with which the two forms (of the Latin rite) are associated, aims therefore to restore to them their Heimat and thus to bring them back into their common home, for we know very well that, in his works on sacramental theology, Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger, well before the publication of Summorum Pontificum, had pointed out that the crisis in the Church and therefore the crisis of the weakening of the faith comes in large measure from the way in which we treat the liturgy, according to the old adage: lex orandi, lex credendi (the law of faith is the law of prayer). In the preface that he wrote for the French edition of the magisterial volume by Msgr. Gamber, La réforme de la liturgie romaine [English edition: The Reform of the Roman Liturgy], the future Pope Benedict XVI said this, and I quote:

A young priest told me recently, “What we need today is a new liturgical movement.” This was an expression of a concern which nowadays only willfully superficial minds could ignore. What mattered to this priest was not winning new, daring liberties: what liberty has not been arrogantly taken already? He thought that we needed a new start coming from within the liturgy, just as the liturgical movement had intended when it was at the height of its true nature, when it was not a matter of fabricating texts or inventing actions and forms, but of rediscovering the living center, of penetrating into the tissue, strictly speaking, of the liturgy, so that the celebration thereof might proceed from its very substance. The liturgical reform, in its concrete implementation, has strayed ever farther from this origin. The result was not a revival but devastation. On the one hand, we have a liturgy that has degenerated into a show, in which one attempts to make religion interesting with the help of fashionable innovations and catchy moral platitudes, with short-lived successes within the guild of liturgical craftsmen, and an even more pronounced attitude of retreat from them on the part of those who seek in the liturgy not a spiritual “emcee”, but rather an encounter with the living God before Whom all “making” becomes meaningless, since that encounter alone is capable of giving us access to the true riches of being. On the other hand, there is the conservation of the ritual forms whose grandeur is always moving, but which, taken to the extreme, manifests a stubborn isolation and finally leaves nothing but sadness. Surely, between these two poles there are still all the priests and their parishioners who celebrate the new liturgy with respect and solemnity; but they are called into question by the contradiction between the two extremes, and the lack of internal unity in the Church finally makes their fidelity appear, wrongly in many cases, to be merely a personal brand of neo-conservatism. Because that is the situation, a new spiritual impulse is necessary if the liturgy is to be once more for us a communitarian activity of the Church and to be delivered from arbitrariness. One cannot “fabricate” a liturgical movement of that sort—any more than one can “fabricate” a living thing—but one can contribute to its development by striving to assimilate anew the spirit of the liturgy, and by defending publicly what one has received in this way.

I think that this long citation, which is so accurate and clear, should be of interest to you, at the beginning of this Colloquium, and also should help to start off your reflections on “the source of the future” (“die Quelle der Zukunft”) of the Motu proprio Summorum Pontificum. Indeed, allow me to communicate to you a conviction that I have held deeply for a long time: the Roman liturgy, reconciled in its two forms, which is itself the “fruit of a development”, as the great German liturgist Joseph Jungmann (1889-1975) put it, can initiate the decisive process of the “liturgical movement” that so many priests and faithful have awaited for so long. Where to begin? I take the liberty of proposing to you the three following paths, which I sum up in the three letters SAF: silence-adoration-formation in English and French, and in German: SAA, Stille-Anbetung-Ausbildung. First of all, sacred silence, without which we cannot encounter God. In my book The Power of Silence, [La Force du silence] I write: “In silence, a human being gains his nobility and his grandeur only if he is on his knees in order to hear and adore God” (n. 66). Next, adoration; in this regard I cite my spiritual experience in the same book, The Power of Silence:

For my part, I know that all the great moments of my day are found in the incomparable hours that I spend on my knees in darkness before the Most Blessed Sacrament of the Body and Blood of Our Lord Jesus Christ. I am so to speak swallowed up in God and surrounded on all sides by His presence. I would like to belong now to God alone and to plunge into the purity of His Love. And yet, I can tell how poor I am, how far from loving the Lord as He loved me to the point of giving Himself up for me. (n. 54)

Finally, liturgical formation based on a proclamation of the faith or catechesis that refers to the Catechism of the Catholic Church, which protects us from possible more-or-less learned ravings of some theologians who long for “novelties”. This is what I said in this connection in what is now commonly called, with some humor, the “London Discourse” of July 5, 2016, given during the Third International Conference of Sacra Liturgia:

The liturgical formation that is primary and essential is…one of immersion in the liturgy, in the deep mystery of God our loving Father. It is a question of living the liturgy in all its richness, so that having drunk deeply from its fount we always have a thirst for its delights, its order and beauty, its silence and contemplation, its exultation and adoration, its ability to connect us intimately with He who is at work in and through the Church’s sacred rites.9

In this global context, therefore, and in a spirit of faith and profound communion with Christ’s obedience on the cross, I humbly ask you to apply Summorum Pontificum very carefully; not as a negative, backward measure that looks toward the past, or as something that builds walls and creates a ghetto, but as an important and real contribution to the present and future liturgical life of the Church, and also to the liturgical movement of our era, from which more and more people, and particularly young people, are drawing so many things that are true, good and beautiful.

I would like to conclude this introduction with the luminous words of Benedict XVI at the end of the homily that he gave in 2008, on the Solemnity of Saints Peter and Paul: “When the world in all its parts has become a liturgy of God, when, in its reality, it has become adoration, then it will have reached its goal and will be safe and sound.”

I thank you for your kind attention. And may God bless you and fill your lives with His silent Presence!

Robert Cardinal Sarah
Prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments

(Translation from the French original by Michael J. Miller.)

Endnotes:

1 “Aggiornamento” is an Italian term that means literally: “updating”. We celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy of Vatican Council II Sacrosanctum Concilium in 2013, since it was promulgated on December 4, 1963.

2 Joseph Ratzinger, Milestones: Memoirs: 1927-1977, translated by Erasmo Leiva-Merikakis (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1998), 148.

3 Cited by Jean Madiran, L’hérésie du XX siècle (Paris: Nouvelles Editions Latines [NEL], 1968), 166.

4 Joseph Ratzinger and Vittorio Messori, The Ratzinger Report: An exclusive interview on the state of the Church, translated by Salvator Attanasio and Graham Harrison (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1985), 29-30.

5 Joseph Ratzinger, Principles of Catholic Theology: Building Stones for a Fundamental Theology, translated by Sister Mary Frances McCarthy, S.N.D. (San Francisco: Ignatius Press, 1992), 370.

6 Cf. Postcommunion for the Easter Vigil and Easter Sunday.

7 Cf. Interview with the Catholic website Aleteia, March 4, 2015.

8 Cf. Interview with La Nef, October 2016, question 9.

9 Cardinal Robert Sarah: Third International Conference of the Sacra Liturgia Association, London. Speech given on July 5, 2016. See the Sacra Liturgia website: “Towards an Authentic Implementation of Sacrosanctum Concilium”, July 11, 2016.http://www.sacraliturgia.org/2016/07/robert-cardinal-sarah-towards-authentic.html

(Text taken from Catholic World Report.)

Solemn Mass for the 10th Anniversary of Summorum Pontificum!

We look forward to you joining us for the 10th Anniversary of Summorum Pontificum, Pope Benedict XVI’s motu proprio which allowed for the newly coined “Extraordinary Form” (also known as the Tridentine Rite or Traditional Latin Mass) to be celebrated more liberally.

2017.07.16.Anniversary Mass

The Latin Mass or the Extraordinary Form: A Little History & Context

St. Anthony’s Catholic Church is fortunate to celebrate Mass according to both the 1962 and 2002 editions of the Roman Missal.  The 1962 edition is what is properly called the “Extraordinary Form” of the Roman Rite and popularly known as the “Tridentine Mass” or “Traditional Latin Mass”.  The 2002 edition is known as the “Ordinary Form” of the Roman Rite or the “Novus Ordo Missae” (New Order of the Mass), and is the form of Mass celebrated in most Roman Catholic parishes today.

The Tridentine Mass, which was promulgated in 1570 by Pope St. Pius V after the Council of Trent (“Tridentine” means “pertaining to Trent”), underwent a number of minor revisions through the years.  As celebrated today, the Tridentine Mass follows the edition of the Roman Missal promulgated by Pope St. John XXIII in 1962.  After the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965), a much more thorough revision of the Roman Missal was completed in 1970.  This revision implemented many changes in the way Mass was celebrated.

While many Catholics embraced these changes enthusiastically, some preferred the beauty, reverence, liturgical poetry, and profound expressions of holy truths of the usus antiquior (ancient rite), and so Pope St. John Paul II gave permission in 1984 — and widened this permission in 1988 — for it to be celebrated in those dioceses whose bishop permitted it.

On July 7, 2007, in the Apostolic Letter Summorum Pontificum, Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI widened permission for the Latin Mass to be offered by parish priests for any stable group within the Church requesting worship according to the 1962 Missal.  This letter replaces the Apostolic Letter Ecclesia Dei of 1988, and its issuance is a most encouraging development i the liturgical life of the Church.

In July 2007, Msgr. Frank Chiodo, pastor at St. Anthony’s Catholic Church, began celebrated the Extraordinary Form and has celebrated it weekly ever since.  Additionally, on certain feasts, he also celebrates the Mass which he holds near and dear to his heart.

 

Why is Latin the Church’s official language?

When the apostles first carried Christ’s Good News to the world, they traveled throughout the Roman Empire, which governed most of the lands around the Mediterranean Sea and in western Europe.  Since the Romans spoke Latin, this language was once used by many people at that time, much as today many people in the world know English because it is economically and socially advantageous.  As the Roman Empire disintegrated in the 4th and 5th centuries, the emerging Church, led by the Bishop of Rome, stepped in to provide a stabilizing cultural force, and through the centuries has retained the use of Latin in official communications as a means to unity.

The Latin language is the national property of no one people, yet, through learning, can be common to all.  This feature makes it especially appropriate for a universal Church.  The use of Latin by the Church started as a happenstance of history and geography, but has enabled the Church to maintain unity amidst the disciples she has made of all nations.

(Excerpts taken and adapted from Holy Rosary Catholic Church, Indianapolis, IN)

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